The time is now to create the CT Office of Community Gun Violence Prevention

The CT Mirror | On a recent Saturday in Hartford, 3-year-old Randell Jones was shot and killed while sitting in a car with his siblings. Later that afternoon, just a mile away, 16-year-old Ja’Mari Preston was shot dead. These are not isolated events. Over the 10-year period ending in 2017, more than 400 young people in Connecticut have been killed by guns. The crisis of gun violence disproportionately affects communities of color. One statistic screams out: young Black men in Connecticut are 39 times more likely than young white men to be slain with a gun.

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State focuses on mental health, gun violence crises made worse by COVID

ctpost | As life returns to normal in Connecticut, the first state in the nation to fully vaccinate 50 percent of its adult population against COVID-19, the pandemic’s mental health toll wages on.

Low infection rates, declining hospitalizations and deaths in the single-digits are all signs the state is “making real progress when it comes to our physical health,” Gov. Ned Lamont said Monday, but he added, “we still do have some healing to do and a lot of that is related to mental health.”

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Desperate to stop epidemic of gun violence, CT lawmakers seek answers from experts

The CT Mirror | When lawmakers gathered Friday to listen to experts from hospitals and community groups about efforts to reduce gun violence in Connecticut’s cities, there were no calls to defund the police.

But there were no calls, either, to give police more money. Instead, the emphasis was on funding the organizations saving lives in cities like Hartford, Bridgeport, New Haven and Waterbury, where 70 percent of Connecticut’s gun homicides occur.

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