OPINION: To Combat Gun Violence, Clean Up the Neighborhood

New York Times | PHILADELPHIA — Until a Black man turns 45, his most likely cause of death is homicide. After each such violent death, traumatic shock waves pierce through family and friends. Whole neighborhoods suffer. In some communities with high rates of violent crime, babies are more likely to be born early, children are more likely to struggle in school and adults are more likely to report being depressed, as well as face increased risk of heart disease.

A recent spike in violent crime in cities across the country has pushed the Biden administration to develop an important federal gun violence prevention strategy. Parents, leaders and activists in Black communities have been fighting against the terror of gun violence for decades. The country is finally catching up to their work.

Click here to read about it in the New York Times.

 

More than 51,000 assault rifles registered in state

Someone in Connecticut owns 179 assault rifles, but if he’s your neighbor, you may never know.

Another state resident has 175 of the semi-automatic rifles that can fire 30 rounds in 15 seconds, like the gun Adam Lanza used to kill 20 first graders and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

A third firearms enthusiast keeps nearly 544,000 high-capacity magazines.

In fact, according to a Hearst Connecticut Media investigation into registration records, there were 51,763 assault weapons in private hands statewide at the end of August — enough to equip an army. In addition, 40,491 residents filed paperwork showing they owned ammunition magazines that hold more than 10 bullets.

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Walmart’s announcement changes gun conversation

Two years after Connecticut banned the sale of military-style weapons following the Sandy Hook Elementary School slaughter, Walmart, the nation’s largest retailer, has concluded they’re not good for business.

The massive chain is pulling AR-15s and other semi-automatic rifles off its store shelves, citing dwindling sales, and sending a national message that the firepower is more than consumers may really need to protect themselves or to take target shooting.

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