Colorado Gov. Jared Polis signs three new gun laws inspired by Boulder shooting. Here’s how they’ll work.

The Denver Post | Colorado will expand background checks, create a gun violence prevention office and give local governments more authority on gun regulations

The Denver Post | In the past seven years , Colorado instituted one new gun law. Lawmakers passed six times that amount in one legislative session, and on Saturday, Gov. Jared Polis signed three of the bills into law.

These bills were announced after the mass shooting at King Soopers in Boulder on March 22, when 10 people were killed.

But, said Boulder Rep. Judy Amabile at the bill signing event, “It isn’t just about mass shootings.

“It’s about what we sadly call everyday gun violence,” said Amabile, a sponsor of one of the bills. “Every day people are dying all across our state from homicides, from accidents, from mass shootings and mostly from suicide.”

Click here to read the full article at The Denver Post.

59 Guns Collected During Hartford Gun Buyback

NBC Connecticut | Hartford Police Department held a gun buyback Saturday morning in an effort to get guns off the street and curb violence in the Capital City.

“The program is fully anonymous. You can come in, give no names, no idea, no questions asked, and you will get a hand receipt showing that you turned in a gun,” Sgt. Chris Mastroianni said.

The gun buyback has been taking place in Hartford for about seven years.

“I think what it does it gives some people an Avenue to get rid of them a lot of people have guns in their house and they just don’t know how to get rid of them,” Sgt. Mastroianni said.

Click here to read the full article and watch a video on NBCConnecticut.com

Woman, 56, was ‘minding her business’ in her Hartford home when she was shot dead, police say; assault rifle used in shooting recovered

The Hartford Courant | A 56-year-old woman who police believe was just “at home, cooking and minding her business,” was killed Wednesday afternoon when gunshots from an assault rifle tore through her apartment in Hartford’s Parkville neighborhood.

Sylvia Cordova was an innocent bystander whose home was simply the backdrop to a confrontation between people on the street outside stemming from a dispute in a different part of the city earlier in the day, completely unrelated to Cordova or her home, police Chief Jason Thody said Thursday.

Click here to read the full article in The Hartford Courant.