When Lori Jackson was murdered last May by a man who police identified as her estranged husband, the mother of two from Oxford had a temporary restraining order in place, prohibiting contact but still allowing him to possess a gun until a hearing took place before a judge.

Now, companion bills crafted in response to the shooting of Jackson, 32, and her mother, who survived, are picking up momentum in the final week of the legislative session and are pitting domestic-violence awareness groups against Second Amendment activists in Connecticut.

The legislation would force those with a temporary restraining order against them to surrender any firearms and ammunition to police upon being served with the no-contact measure.

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